Hanif Qadir

Founder
Active Change Foundation
Hanif Qadir is the CEO of the Active Change Foundation, a London-based organization he co-founded in 2003 to encourage young people to embrace a positive future, and to help young people in danger of becoming radicalized. A former foreign fighter himself, Hanif once joined Al Qaeda members in Afghanistan, but was deterred by the crimes he saw being committed against civilians and turned his back on them. Upon his return to the UK, he vowed to safeguard young men and women from similar experiences, losing their lives and harming their communities. Having a unique understanding and hard-won experience of the modus operandi of A.Q./ ISIS inspired groups and individuals, he is now recognized as arguably the best violent extremist and de-radicalization expert in Europe. He is actively involved in advising and assisting senior policy makers in reforming key aspects of the Preventing Violent Extremism (PVE) and Counter Violent Extremism (CVE), working closely with a wide range of governmental institutions, most of the UK’s Police Authorities, as well as research academics across the globe. Among his many missions is encouraging Countries and their leaders to invest in their young people in order to create positive future and personal resilience before extremists could invest in them. At the same time, Hanif and his team are actively involved in using social media to engage Muslims in condemning ISIS, like in their ‘Not in my name’ campaign.


11:50 AM PANEL DISCUSSION: ADMITTING THAT THE ROLE OF FORMER FIGHTERS AND THEIR ROLE IN COUNTERING VIOLENT EXTREMISM HAS NOT REACHED ITS FULL POTENTIAL

  • What insight can de-radicalised extremists give us into the success that VEO’s have with their soft power ‘hearts and minds’ campaigns to drive recruitment?
  • How can we effectively use de-radicalised individuals to add credence to our messaging efforts? Do these individuals have more credibility with our intended audience as a result of having “been there”, or are they viewed in a more negative light?
  • How can we be better utilising former fighters to promote effective counter messaging against these recruitment campaigns?
  • How do we ensure that we are probably vetting those former extremists that we work with are totally engaged with the CVE campaigns, with no ulterior motives? At the same time, how do we prevent re-engagement with VEO’s whilst the vetting process is occurring?
  • How do you reintegrate former extremists?

11:40 AM PANEL DISCUSSION: IMPROVING CVE INTEROPERABILITY BOTH DOMESTICALLY AND INTERNATIONALLY BY IDENTIFYING THE CHALLENGES WE ALL FACE

  • How can the government better promote cooperation with NGOs to achieve the same aims?
  • How can the role of the military be better used in longer term CVE efforts in unison with soft government and NGO CVE stakeholders?
  • What can be done to improve the efforts in countering the use of the interest for terrorist purposes globally?
  • How can border control and travel document security be improved by the timely exchange of information, intelligence and data?
  • What lessons can be learnt from the experiences in countering violent extremism in the far right/Northern Ireland that can be used across all CVE campaigns?
  • How can we better co-ordinate between NGO’s, government institutions and the military to ensure all stakeholders (internal and external) have been identified and are managed correctly?